Liberate your workforce

Generation video: Tomorrow’s workforce culture

Smarter Staff
Smarter Writer

This article has been written by the Smarter Business™ Staff Writers

Smarter Staff
Smarter Writer

This article has been written by the Smarter Business™ Staff Writers

Highlights
  • As the young workforce expands, they expect to use the digital technologies they’ve grown up on.
  • A video-first culture, with access for everyone, engages workers and offers added benefits such as access to senior executives. 
  • Healthcare and education are big winners in the video-first world: Doctors and students can be anywhere.

The growth of a digitally-connected workforce means businesses should not simply think about building a video-first culture; collaboration should already be the norm.

As more and more new graduates join the workforce, now is the time for all aspects of the workplace to evolve – from HR to communications and everything in between. According to James Brennan, Director, Asia Pacific at cloud communications provider BlueJeans Network, video is the next step to unlocking this evolution.  

Today’s workforce has increasingly grown up with video as a primary means of communication. People are also wedded to smartphones and want to be able to put the two together for work communications.  

“The millennial expectation is that that they are going to have that video capability and the more natural engagement that goes with it,” Brennan says. “When they enter the workforce, they want to take that next step into a higher quality experience.”

There are added benefits to building a video-first workplace, such as unprecedented access for employees to senior executives. In the past, video conferencing has been one-on-one, but new technology makes it one-to-many, Brennan says.

The simplicity and usability of video conferencing makes it very difficult for users to revert to traditional ways of working, Brennan adds. “Users who have come from an organisation with a video-first culture find it very hard to move to an organisation that doesn’t use those technologies.”

Generation Video: Tomorrow’s workforce culture

The growth of a digitally-connected workforce means businesses should not simply think about building a video-first culture; collaboration should already be the norm.

[Transcript]

James Brennan, Director, Asia Pacific, BlueJeans Network

 

Video communication is the next evolution of communication.

People are becoming more used to using more videos, as younger workers are joining the workforce. Their expectation is that they are going to have that video capability and that more natural engagement, and when they enter the workforce, they want to take that next step into a higher quality experience.

The historical way of thinking of video conferencing is that it’s a specialised application that’s done in a particular place or for particular people. Typically it’s been for senior management and executives, and you’ve got to go into a boardroom, and you’ve got to schedule those resources and IT needs to be there to help with that. What we’re trying to drive with the video-first mentality is that everybody gets access to it.  

Remote healthcare in Australia is a large concern. Video is a great way to solve some of that distance issue with healthcare, education very similarly, being able to offer a continuity of education regardless of where those students are located.

It’s a tool that is used on a daily basis. It’s not something special, it just becomes embedded into the culture and the fabric of that organisation.  

What are the applications? What are the ways? What are the best practices? How are other organisations benefiting from the use of video?  Really, opening their eyes, because that change to a video-first culture doesn’t happen overnight.

By introducing it and making it very easy and simple, users get more comfortable with the technology. And we find that once they make that shift, users who have come from an organisation with a video first culture find it very hard to move to an organisation that doesn’t use those technologies. 

In today's fast-paced business environment, your people need to communicate with each other, partners and customers at a moment's notice. And you need those interactions to be richer and more productive.

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